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Weekly update 33 (sunrise edition)

Wow, what a day! I got up at about 3:30 this morning and have been going non-stop dealing with the masses of feedback as a result of the billion-and-a-bit breached records I'm presently loading into HIBP. I talk about it in the blog post, but the "small" one of 458 million records is already loaded and as I type this, at about 17:30 Friday, the big one of almost 600M is still a long way off (probably mid-morning for me tomorrow). Anyway, between other commitments and the looong lead-time of uploading a couple of GB of video file over Aussie bandwidth, this week's update happened at sunrise out the back of my house. The lighting it far from...

Password reuse, credential stuffing and another billion records in Have I been pwned

The short version: I'm loading over 1 billion breached accounts into HIBP. These are from 2 different "combo lists", collections of email addresses and passwords from all sorts of different locations. I've verified their accuracy (including my own record in one of them) and many hundreds of millions of the email addresses are not already in HIBP. Because of the nature of the data coming from different places, if you're in there then treat it as a reminder that your data is out there circulating around and that you need to go and get yourself a password manager and create strong, unique passwords. And before you ask for your password from the data, read about all the reasons I don't...

Microsoft Flow + Azure Storage + WebJobs + MailChimp + Outlook

A few years back, I added a donations page to Have I been pwned (HIBP). Now as I explained at the time, I didn't particularly need them to cover my hard-cash outgoings because I run the thing on a shoestring, but as I explain on that page, it takes a massive amount of effort. If people want to fling me a coffee or some beers, that's just great and I appreciate it enormously. Problem is, it's hard to individually show that appreciation. Especially during a busy period, I can end up with a lot of coffee and I can't realistically reply to each and every person by email thanking them or I end up with exactly the problem I describe...

Reckon you've seen some stupid security things? Here, hold my beer...

My mate Lars Klint shared this tweet the other day: Your password is not unique. pic.twitter.com/ga4GwxtzrQ— Lars Klint (@larsklint) April 16, 2017 Naturally, I passed it on because let's face it, that's some crazy shit going on right there. To which the Twitters responded with equal parts abject horror and berating comments for not having already identified this as a joke circulating on Reddit. But here's the thing - it's feasible. No really, I've seen some very stupid security stuff out there the likes of which make the above example not just believable, but likely. Don't believe me? Here, hold my beer... Remember me Let's say you want to build a "remember me" feature, you know,...

Weekly update 32

Home again and blog wise, it was a quiet week. I've been working on some new material you'll see next month as well as preparing for upcoming Europe travels where I've got a heap of events to get to. I've got a new Lenovo to show you in this update plus I do talk quite a bit about that one blog post on building out a Ubiquiti network for my brother and his family which I'm now kinda jealous of! All that and a few other things in the update below, I've got a few extra things in the works for next week. iTunes podcast | Google Play Music podcast | RSS podcast References Here's the full specs on that Lenovo Yoga...

Wiring a home network from the ground-up with Ubiquiti

The title of this blog post is what many of us techie folks dream of - free reign to build your own home network! It might seem like a pretty geeky dream (ok, it is a pretty geeky dream), but the reality is that we're increasingly dependent on our home networks these days because of the amount of stuff we connect to them. That little consumer-grade combination modem and wireless access point your ISP gave you or the one you bought from the local PC store is going to struggle to provide fast, reliable connectivity across the house to all your devices; that very architecture predates smart phones, connected TVs and the (frankly ridiculous) array of IoT things we have...

Weekly update 31 (Sydney Opera House edition)

Another beautiful spot today while I'm back in Sydney working on the agenda for NDC here in August. It's a quick trip albeit one very jammed-packed as we work through over 700 talk submissions and try to distil them down to the best ~135 of the bunch. There's a few weeks of early bird tickets left so if you're down here in Aus (or feel like a holiday), get in and grab them cheap. This week, I'm really excited about this: This is awesome - for the first time after 5 years and 30 @pluralsight courses, I've got one rating a perfect 5! https://t.co/awZ2Ow8qKu pic.twitter.com/IZ4BB57D3b— Troy Hunt (@troyhunt) April 20, 2017...

New Pluralsight course: Azure Beyond Websites

I've been really actively involved with building things on Microsoft's Azure cloud for probably about 4 or 5 years now. Many of you will know already that Have I been pwned (HIBP) was built from the ground up on Azure (in fact, one of the reasons I built the service was to play with Azure "in anger"!), what less people know is the work I'd been doing before that. In my previous life looking after Pfizer's software architecture in this corner of the world, I was pushing hard to move apps we were building into Azure, in particular the PaaS constructs they have available. Time and time again, the discussion would go like this: Vendor: (Pfizer outsourced all their dev...

All your websites using StartCom certificates are about to break

A Twitterer sent me this a few days ago: .@troyhunt you've got SSL issues in Chrome 58+ on @ASafaWeb pic.twitter.com/qtUiMxV9tW— Jonathan (@Eonasdan) April 13, 2017 Now normally when I get a report about an SSL thing not working (by which we mean TLS, but we say SSL anyway), I jump on over to SSL Labs (see?!) and run a report I can then direct people to. This usually provides emphatic proof that the SSL configuration is fine and they've just got an old client or some funky MitM stuff going on in their local network. However, this time was different: "Grade will be capped to T". Now I didn't immediately realise what "T" was,...

Mandatory ISP data retention and the law of unintended consequences

Well, good one Australia, UK and whoever else has embarked on this hare-brained scheme, you've just made things a whole lot worse. Our respective governments (in all their ivory-towered wisdom), have decided that because one of us could one day decide to become a terrorist, they'd better keep a big whack of our internet browsing history just in case. The theory these genius policy makers have is that if they can probe into all our lives far enough, they'll be able to see when we're doing terrorist kinda stuff. And really, what better way is there than siphoning up info on the websites we go to? Job done, beer o'clock, glad we solved that one. Except no, they've just made...