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Troy Hunt

Hi, I'm Troy Hunt, I write this blog, create courses for Pluralsight and am a Microsoft Regional Director and MVP who travels the world speaking at events and training technology professionals

Weekly Update 75

Every now and then, I look at one of the videos I've just recorded and only realise then how tired I look. This was one of those weeks and it was absolutely jam-packed! There was some awesome stuff and there was some very frustrating stuff. Let me add briefly to the latter here: The joy of participating in online communities is that we have these melting pots of diverse backgrounds and ideas all coming together in the one place. A huge portion of what I've learned personally has come from very robust debates within these communities and in turn, I hope others have also learned from me. These discussions are awesome; they make us all better people and better professionals....

I've Just Launched "Pwned Passwords" V2 With Half a Billion Passwords for Download

Last August, I launched a little feature within Have I Been Pwned (HIBP) I called Pwned Passwords. This was a list of 320 million passwords from a range of different data breaches which organisations could use to better protect their own systems. How? NIST explains: When processing requests to establish and change memorized secrets, verifiers SHALL compare the prospective secrets against a list that contains values known to be commonly-used, expected, or compromised. They then go on to recommend that passwords "obtained from previous breach corpuses" should be disallowed and that the service should "advise the subscriber that they need to select a different secret". This makes a lot of sense when you think about it:...

Weekly Update 74

I had plans this week. Monday was going to be full of coding work around Pwned Passwords V2 (and a few other HIBP things) then Texthelp went and got themselves pwned and there went my day writing about the ramifications of that. This is a genuinely important issue and the whole concept of the JavaScript supply chain needs much better thought. We've got the technology, it's just that most people don't know it exists! I did then later get around to posting my "dark web" piece too. It's a scary read because it has dark stuff, hoodies and green screens and we know that's scary because that's the message we keep getting fed! Actually, not so scary and...

Making Light of the "Dark Web" (and Debunking the FUD)

I'll start this post where I start many of my talks - what does a hacker look like? Or perhaps more specifically, what do people think a hacker looks like? It's probably a scary image, one that's a bit mysterious, a shady character lurking in the hidden depths of the internet. People have this image in their mind because that's what they've been conditioned to believe: These are the images that adorn the news pieces we read and we've all seen them before. Hell, we've seen literally the same guy over and over again. See that bloke in the bottom right? He's the guy! No really, I wrote about him last year and exposed his involvement in everything from state-sponsored...

The JavaScript Supply Chain Paradox: SRI, CSP and Trust in Third Party Libraries

A couple of years back as the US presidential campaign was ramping up, the Trump camp did something stupid. I know, we're all shocked but bear with me because it's an important part of the narrative of this post. One of their developers embedded this code in the campaign's donation website: <script src="https://github.com/igorescobar/jQuery-Mask-Plugin/blob/gh-pages/js/jquery.mask.min.js" type="text/javascript></script> See the problem? This tag was in the source code over at secure.donaldjtrump.com/donate-homepage yet it was pulling script directly off Igor Escobar's GitHub repository for the project. Now, imagine if Igor took a dislike to Trump. Or someone else took issue with the bloke...

Weekly Update 73

I'm not entirely sure how I've gotten to the end of the week feeling completely wrung out whilst having only written the one thing, but here we are. In fairness though, I've put a heap of work into Pwned Passwords version 2 and finally completed the data set. There's some coding work and other logistics to complete before it goes live, but the plan for now is week after next so I'm looking forward to that. This week, it's all about minimum password lengths. In isolation, that sounds a little mundane but in the context of the broader picture of how authentication has evolved, I think it makes for an interesting discussion. By pure coincidence, I was very happy to...

How Long is Long Enough? Minimum Password Lengths by the World's Top Sites

I've been giving a bunch of thought to passwords lately. Here we have this absolute cornerstone of security - a paradigm that every single person with an online account understands - yet we see fundamentally different approaches to how services handle them. Some have strict complexity rules. Some have low max lengths. Some won't let you paste a password. Some force you to regularly rotate it. It's all over the place. Last year, I wrote about authentication guidance for the modern era and I talked about many of the aforementioned requirements. I particularly focused on how today's thinking is at odds with many of the traditional views of how passwords should be handled. That post has a lot of guidance...

Weekly Update 72

I'm home! It's nice being home 😀 This week I start by getting a couple of things off my chest, namely some pretty wacky reactions to my suggesting that we're never going to see a coders' hippocratic oath and how I feel when media outlets say "the dark web". Plus, I've got news around running workshops in Europe with Scott Helme and me finally getting a content security policy on this blog. That last one in particular makes me very happy because it really shouldn't have been this hard, but it was (for reasons I explain in the video) and it's now working fantastically! All that and more in this week's update. iTunes podcast | Google Play Music podcast | RSS...

My Blog Now Has a Content Security Policy - Here's How I've Done It

I've long been a proponent of Content Security Policies (CSPs). I've used them to fix mixed content warnings on this blog after Disqus made a little mistake, you'll see one adorning Have I Been Pwned (HIBP) and I even wrote a dedicated Pluralsight course on browser security headers. I'm a fan (which is why I also recently joined Report URI), and if you're running a website, you should be too. But it's not all roses with CSPs and that's partly due to what browsers will and will not let you do and partly due to what the platforms running our websites will and will not let you do. For example, this blog runs on Ghost Pro which is a managed...

I'm Teaming Up with Scott Helme to Run "Hack Yourself First" Workshops in Europe

This is probably the most self-explanatory blog post title I've ever written! But be that as it may, it deserves some explanation as to how I've arrived at this point and like many great ideas, it began over some beers... I've just arrived home to the Gold Coast in Australia which I frequently describe to people as "the sunny part of the sunny country". I'm literally sitting on a beach writing this blog post and frankly, I'd like to spend more time here. I spent 37% of 2017 away from home and whilst I had many fantastic experiences, it's both hard work and time away from a young family. Consequently, I'm trying to do shorter trips (the one...