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Troy Hunt

Hi, I'm Troy Hunt, I write this blog, run "Have I Been Pwned" and am a Microsoft Regional Director and MVP who travels the world speaking at events and training technology professionals

Weekly Update 388

It's just been a joy to watch the material produced by the NCA and friends following the LockBit takedown this week. So much good stuff from the agencies themselves, not just content but high quality trolling too. Then there's the whole ecosystem of memes that have since emerged and provided endless hours of entertainment 😊 I'm sure we'll see a lot more come out of this yet and inevitably there's seized material that will still be providing value to further investigations years from now. Good j...

Thanks FedEx, This is Why we Keep Getting Phished

I've been getting a lot of those "your parcel couldn't be delivered" phishing attacks lately and if you're a human with a phone, you probably have been too. Just as a brief reminder, they look like this: These get through all the technical controls that exist at my telco and they land smack bang in my SMS inbox. However, I don't fall for the scams because I look for the warning signs: a sense of urgency, fear of missing out, and strange URLs that look nothing like any parcel delivery service I...

Weekly Update 387

It's a short video this week after a few days in Sydney doing both NDC and the Azure user group. For the most part, I spoke about the same things as I did at NDC Security in Oslo last month... except that since then we've had the Spoutibe incident. It was fascinating to talk about this in front of a live audience and see everyone's reactions first hand, let's just say there were a lot of "oh wow!" responses 😲 References 1. Sponsored by: Unpatched devices keeping you up at night? Kolide...

Weekly Update 386

Somehow, an hour and a half went by in the blink of an eye this week. The Spoutible incident just has so many interesting aspects to it: loads of data that should never be returned publicly, awesome response time to the disclosure, lacklustre transparency in their disclosure, some really fundamental misunderstands about hashing algorithms and a controversy-laden past if you read back over events of the last year. Phew! No wonder so much time went on this! (and if you want to just jump directly t...

How Spoutible’s Leaky API Spurted out a Deluge of Personal Data

Ever hear one of those stories where as it unravels, you lean in ever closer and mutter “No way! No way! NO WAY!” This one, as far as infosec stories go, had me leaning and muttering like never before. Here goes: Last week, someone reached out to me with what they claimed was a Spoutible data breach obtained by exploiting an enumerable API. Just your classic case of putting someone else's username in the URL and getting back data about them, which at first glance I assumed was another scraping...

Weekly Update 385

I told ya so. Right from the beginning, it was pretty obvious what "MOAB" was probably going to be and sure enough, this tweet came true: Interesting find by @MayhemDayOne, wonder if it was from a shady breach search service (we’ve seen a bunch shut down over the years)? Either way, collecting and storing this data is now trivial so not a big surprise to see someone screw up their permissions and (re)leak it all. https://t.co/DM7udeUcRk — Troy Hunt (@troyhunt) January 22, 2024 What I didn...

The Data Breach "Personal Stash" Ecosystem

I've always thought of it a bit like baseball cards; a kid has a card of this one player that another kid is keen on, and that kid has a card the first one wants so they make a trade. They both have a bunch of cards they've collected over time and by virtue of existing in the same social circles, trades are frequent, and cards flow back and forth on a regular basis. That's the analogy I often use to describe the data breach "personal stash" ecosystem, but with one key difference: if you trade a...

Weekly Update 384

I spent longer than I expected talking about Trello this week, in part because I don't feel the narrative they presented properly acknowledges their responsibility for the incident and in part because I think the impact of scraping in general is misunderstood. I suspect many of us are prone to looking at this in a very binary fashion: if the data is publicly accessible anyway, scraping it poses no risk. But in my view, there's a hell of a big difference between say, looking at one person's perso...

Weekly Update 383

They're an odd thing, credential lists. Whether they're from a stealer as in this week's Naz.API incident, or just aggregated from multiple data breaches (which is also in Naz.API), I inevitably get some backlash after loading them: "this doesn't tell me anything useful, why are you loading this?!" The answer is easy: because that's what the vast majority of people want me to do: If I have a MASSIVE spam list full of personal data being sold to spammers, should I load it into @haveibeenpwned?...

Inside the Massive Naz.API Credential Stuffing List

It feels like not a week goes by without someone sending me yet another credential stuffing list. It's usually something to the effect of "hey, have you seen the Spotify breach", to which I politely reply with a link to my old No, Spotify Wasn't Hacked blog post (it's just the output of a small set of credentials successfully tested against their service), and we all move on. Occasionally though, the corpus of data is of much greater significance, most notably the Collection #1 incident of early...