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Scam

A 20-post collection

The Australian Taxation Office scam call

I actually thought that once I didn’t bother connecting a landline after moving house recently, it would be the end of scam calls. I used to get them all the time – the ones where they’d call up and say you had viruses on your PC – and my recordings of those turned out to be rather popular. But today I had another call, although this one went a bit differently. First off, I missed a call in the morning from a Sydney landline number which was 02 6064 2043. There was no voicemail left and the call wouldn’t connect when I tried getting back in touch so I dismissed it. Then later this...

The opportunistic and empty threat that is data breach victim extortion

So someone sent me this on the weekend: They asked me to censor the Bitcoin address because as you can see above, it’s unique to them and quite understandably, they don’t want anything that can tie this blackmail attempt back to them going public. Except that the address is a perfect match with this one: Looks like some people are attempting to capitalize on the @Patreon hack/leak. @Troyhunt. Kinda funny to me. pic.twitter.com/8EpgFZBBFu— Brett (SirCrest) (@SirCrest) November 21, 2015 And hey, wouldn’t you know it, it’s the same as this one too: I know what was leaked, and dont give a damn =P (@troyhunt, it appears its...

The unabating cold call virus scams

Update: Literally an hour after posting this, I had another call running the same scam. As suggested earlier, I broadcast this one via Periscope and you can can go back and watch it via the app. I’ll be more organised next time and have a special machine ready for them :) These things just don’t stop. I had my first seriously nasty one a few years ago which I summarily recorded, annotated and published for amusement and education. 817k views later and, well, clearly these are both entertaining and unabating so I keep capturing them. I actually hadn’t received any for quite some time then I had one a few days ago from “Telstra&...

This is your bank, please verify your details – No, you verify YOUR details!

The phone rings from a concealed number and you pick up: Hello? Silence. More silence. Eventually a foreign voice enters: Hi, this is your bank, we need you to verify some details. This is the point where you should be disclosing absolutely nothing, at least nothing that is not known already which is probably just your phone number and perhaps your name if they’ve greeted you with it. No, I’m not revealing my address or my account numbers or my password because frankly, I don’t trust you. Don’t get me wrong – it’s not because of your foreign accent – but it’s because it’s part of...

Scammer identifies “viruses” in a brand new Windows Azure VM then asks to be bought porn

I thought I’d seen it all when it comes to cold call virus scammers, you know, the guys who call you up from “Windows” because they’ve had reports of viruses from your machine? I’ve recorded their audio, recorded their video, antagonised them, interviewed one of the blokes behind it, tried to tell them I was Dutch and even convinced them that I was Mick Dundee. But this was the first time one of them asked me to buy him porn. After showing it to me. The whole thing was recorded (and then appropriately censored) and is available for your education and amusement here: For those that don’t want to sit...

Inside the Facebook Snapchat phishing scam

I’m frequently amused by the sort of stuff my Facebook friends “like”. For example: The more salacious content you find around Facebook often has a hidden agenda, for example the classic She did WHAT in school scam I wrote about last year. Snapchat allows you to take a pic or a video and set an expiry date after which it’s “theoretically” destroyed, just the sort of stuff that appeals to sexting teens. By extension, “leaked” Snapchats are just the sort of stuff that appeal to a whole different audience. Looking at the Leaked Snapchats 18+ page on Facebook, we can see it’s rather popular: Not bad for a...

Bloody galah scammers still not getting the message

As regular readers will know by now, I’m not real fond of virus call centre scammers. You know, the ones who call you up while you’re making dinner or bathing and kids and tell you they’re from Microsoft and that your PC is infected with blah blah polymorphic blah? There’s a bunch of material on this blog already under the Scam tag where I’ve captured the experience and shared it for fun and education. Thing is, the bloody galahs keep calling me so I worked out a little scenario for them… In this latest call from only a couple of hours ago I allow them into my “Scammer...

Facebook fantasies: Press Like and type the number 1 and see what happens to the image!

I’ve seen a few of these going around now, usually with different photos with some sort of mystique: The implied promise is of something interesting happening once you’ve clicked the like button and typed the number 1. There was one with an attractive girl and a square superimposed over her shoulder doing the rounds a little while ago too. I’ve seen others where the instructions are more explicit in terms of words or phrases to type. Here’s a good question: what usually happens when you like and comment on something in Facebook? The numbers go up (and you can see they’re already substantial) and it gets posted to your wall....

Cold call virus scams are still alive and well

Regular readers of this blog would have seen sagas such as Anatomy of a virus call centre scam, Scamming the scammers – catching the virus call centre scammers red-handed and my personal favourite, “Type www.” – “Ok, w-w-w-d-o-t”; antagonising call centre scammers. That’s not an exhaustive list, indeed there are more videos on this blog and yet more phone calls that never made it here. A few months back there was a bunch of news around the FTC cracking down on these scams. Problem is, the FTC has about zero jurisdiction in India where the scams are originating from! They also have zero jurisdiction in anywhere that isn’t America so the effectiveness...

Please login to your Facebook account: the execution of a data mining scam

So someone sends you a link to the latest Gangnam parody / cat meme / man jumping on frozen pool video and the link looks something like this: http://bit.ly/10PMelv Nothing unusual about this, every second link shared these days uses a bit.ly or t.co (or comparable) URL shortener. Because you have an insatiable desire to participate in the latest social phenomenon, you click through and see this: There’s also nothing unusual about Facebook asking you for credentials, let’s log in. Aw c’mon, not this old trick of “now we want more crap from you before you can view the page”: Ok, fill it in and continue. Great, it wants...