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Career Development

A 7-post collection

7 years of blogging and a lifetime later...

Exactly 7 years ago today, I wrote my first blog post titled Why online identities are smart career moves. That's a pretty self-explanatory title and I wrote it while gainfully employed in a job I'd been in for 8 years at the time, but it's worth a quick read as it sets the scene for this post. I may have had a steady job, but I knew I wouldn't always be there... I won't go into all the background here, if you want the details of what led to my eventual departure from big corporate then have a read of How I optimised my life to make my job redundant. What I thought I'd do here instead is talk just...

Making a clean exit – how to leave your company with friends, not dependencies

As I’ve now widely publicised, I left Pfizer a few months back after 14 years with the firm. You build up a lot of dependencies over 14 years, a lot of access to systems and a lot of people who count on you. As I was preparing to exit, I made a bunch of notes in a draft blog post because firstly, as I recently wrote in How I optimised my life to make my job redundant, I find this helps me ensure I get things right. But secondly, this should be useful for others because we do tend to create a long tail of dependencies on us as technical people. It’s not just about not...

How I optimised my life to make my job redundant

If you’re a regular reader, you may have noticed a rather major job change on my behalf recently. The day to day office grind has gone and corporate life is now well and truly behind me, where it will firmly stay. One of the things that amazed me most when I finally wrote about this is how surprised so many people were that I actually had a normal day job: Can't believe @troyhunt had another job as well! #inspiration https://t.co/918HOFSGLA— Conrad Jackson (@conradj) April 15, 2015 @troyhunt Put me in the category of "didn't know you had a day-job apart from the blog/speaking/etc". Wow.— Tommy...

</pfizer><pluralsight>

So the dust has finally settled. A month ago I wrote about </pfizer> which marked my departure from the corporate world after spending the last 14 years building and managing their software things across a good whack of the world. With that chapter now formally closed, it’s time to talk about the next phase. It’s time to talk about Pluralsight. The path to Pluralsight It was 2012 when I made the decision to become a Pluralsight Author. I’d been writing and speaking a lot about security in general and the OWASP Top 10 specifically in which I’d invested massive amounts of time writing the series on this blog. It took...

</pfizer>

Today marks two important milestones for me – it’s the first time I’ve ever mentioned Pfizer on this blog and after 14 years, it’s my last day working for them. Both those milestones are significant and in their own ways, mark a pivotal point in my career. For those that are interested, I’d like to tell you what I’ve been doing in recent years and give a hint of what will come next. “Architect” There’s this odd thing that tends to happen in many peoples’ careers and I suggest it’s particularly prevalent in technology: you get really, really good at something and then...

The ghost who codes: how anonymity is killing your programming career

He lurks quietly in the darkness emerging only to briefly churn out some markup during business hours. He has no face, no name, no records. His only weapon is his word. He is: This is not the work of fiction, these ghosts walk among us, blending seamlessly into their environment until one day they emerge, seeking a job somewhere else. And when they do, prospective employers look for them and… they can’t be found. Anywhere. Yes, the “Ghost Who Codes” is real and you may even be one of them without realising what it’s doing to your career. But it’s not too late – you can still emerge from the shadowy...

Why online identities are smart career moves

The final catalyst for me eventually taking the leap into the blogosphere came from an unexpected source. It was actually my own response to a Stack Overflow Question where I’d suggested that one of the best ways to make yourself more marketable as a software developer is to have an active online profile. I don’t necessarily mean to try and achieve semi celebrity status like Scott Guthrie or Joel Spolsky, rather to be able to illustrate that over time, you’ve been actively involved in the areas in which you profess to have expertise. It’s one thing to present a CV or a LinkedIn profile which says you’ve done everything from...