Pwned Passwords

A 13-post collection

I Wanna Go Fast: Why Searching Through 500M Pwned Passwords Is So Quick

In the immortal words of Ricky Bobby, I wanna go fast. When I launched Pwned Passwords V2 last week, I made it fast - real fast - and I want to talk briefly here about why that was important, how I did it and then how I've since shaved another 56% off the load time for requests that hit the origin. And a bunch of other cool perf stuff while I'm here. Why Speed Matters for Pwned Passwords Firstly, read the previous post about k-Anonymity and protecting the privacy of passwords to save me repeating it all here. I've been amazed at how quickly this has been adopted since I pushed it out very early on Thursday morning my time....

I've Just Launched "Pwned Passwords" V2 With Half a Billion Passwords for Download

Last August, I launched a little feature within Have I Been Pwned (HIBP) I called Pwned Passwords. This was a list of 320 million passwords from a range of different data breaches which organisations could use to better protect their own systems. How? NIST explains: When processing requests to establish and change memorized secrets, verifiers SHALL compare the prospective secrets against a list that contains values known to be commonly-used, expected, or compromised. They then go on to recommend that passwords "obtained from previous breach corpuses" should be disallowed and that the service should "advise the subscriber that they need to select a different secret". This makes a lot of sense when you think about it:...

Introducing 306 Million Freely Downloadable Pwned Passwords

Edit 1: The following day, I loaded another set of passwords which has brought this up to 320M. More on why later on. Edit 2: The API model described below has subsequently been discontinued in favour of the k-anonymity model launched with V2. Last week I wrote about Passwords Evolved: Authentication Guidance for the Modern Era with the aim of helping those building services which require authentication to move into the modern era of how we think about protecting accounts. In that post, I talked about NIST's Digital Identity Guidelines which were recently released. Of particular interest to me was the section advising organisations to block subscribers from using passwords that have previously appeared in a data breach. Here's the...